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State of emergency declared in Darfur region of Sudan

Fighting in Darfur has prompted the declaration of a region-wide state of emergency

Renewed clashes in Darfur have led to the declaration of a state of emergency in that part of Sudan.

A confrontation between demonstrators and security forces in Sudan resulted in chaotic scenes on 14 July. The confrontation followed weeks of protests by some citizens which culminated in an attack on the police.

The BBC reports that the clashes were particularly severe in the town of Kutum, where a police station was burned.

The riots continued in other areas, with demonstrators creating further trouble by setting cars on fire.

The African Union-United Nations Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) has since sent a team to the town to restore calm.

Five die during chaos

The western region of Darfur has been beset by violence again in recent weeks, following unrest in two towns.

Local people have been demonstrating as they demand better security and a civilian state government.

Despite the toppling of the autocrat Omar el-Bashir, who ruled Sudan for 30 years, state governor positions in Sudan are still held by military officers.

The clashes escalated over the weekend and it required the intervention of security troops for the protesters to be dispersed.

State media reported, however, that five people died after security officers fired several live rounds while trying to control the protesters.

State of emergency

Meanwhile, the Sudanese government has reacted by declaring a state of emergency in the Darfur region.

Although there have been peaceful sit-ins in towns across the region, residents are unhappy about the presence of armed militias.

But the transitional civilian government in Khartoum has vowed to end the conflict in the region.

With a state of emergency declared in some towns, it is expected that the violence and unrest will calm.

E A Alanore

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Source
BBC News
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